About your Search

20120901
20120930
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
of saudi intelligence, ambassador to the united states and other countries >> a throughou these 80 some years that we have had our kingdom, everybody keeps talking about an uncertain future for the kingdom and because of the sagacity of the people of saudi arabia and the good will of the leadership and the government we have survived pretty well so far we have many problems to face, including syria. many challenges internal among the ung pele and how the go about the courses of development not just economically but socially and politically and the role of women, etc. all of these are tremendous challenges that are being debated within the kingdom and not coming from the outside. >> rose: tom friedman and prince turki al-faisal when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tom friedman is here, he is a pulitzer prize winning columnist in for the "new york times." for more than 30 years he's been writing ant foreign affairs, american politics and so much more. in addition to serving as bureau chief in beirut
of the world live in the united states. and we are a consumer goods company, so we sell to where people are and, therefore, when you expect that there is or than 95 percent of the population of the world live outside of the united states you would spec we would have a large business outside of the united states. >> rose: is it primarily coca-cola or is it not the company but the drink or is it all kind of water products that seem mohr in demand than ever? >> i think we talk, we just -- >> rose: what makes the people outside of the united states -- >> we look at ourselves as the number one and premiere beverage company in the world and we have -- we offer 3,000 products, 500 more than, 500 brands and choice i think is the key. >> rose: but how is that change something it has to be changing, is the produc mix change something aren't you finding the demand for things you weren't making five years ago? >> yes, and that's why i think choice is great. you have to offer consumers choice. see, what we have -- the way the world has changed is that for the first time in the history of our planet there ar
the united states because of the role it played in toppling colonel qaddafi, but also because coy say with every conversation i have had with every libyan here in the last three or four days a sense of shock, dismay and embarrassment over what happened at the killing of th u.s. em was door. and think that has really been wakup cl for many here who, in fact, want to take action now against these militias and armed groups, whether they are able to do it or not is another question. >> brown: are you picking up any more about who was responsible, who's being looked at, who is being discussed over there? >> i mean it is early. most people assume that it's radical jihadist group which is known here and which now some of the militias are going after. but there is really a broader problem here. the problem ishat since the fall of qaddafi the authorities are relying not on their own security forces, becauseheyon't have any they have subcontracted security to militias and armed groups because they need someone to step in. but those very forces are the ones that are fueling the instability and t
, when should united nations or member states intervene? >> well, these are different situations. in libya, i think we've been right in intervening because gaddafi was a dictator, and you remember that there was a sort of libyan spring, and nobody was possible because of gaddafi. therefore, a decision was taken to intervene. >> rose: is the principle you don't intervene no matter how atroacials the acts of the government in power, if in fact they have a member of the security council who opposes? or if in fact they have an army which will make it a very bloody affair. >> no. >> rose: are those the rules? >> no. the rule is because of veto if one or two people-- nations -- permanent security members-- we cannot contribute because our principle is to intervene only if we have a legal authorization. and up to now, three times, russia and china say no. and, therefore, up to now, we haven't been able to intervene. which is a humanitarian catastrophe. because every day you have more than 200 people killed. and because the security council doesn't say yes, we can't do anything. no, it's
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)